How Does COVID Affect Me? VeDA’s Medical and Scientific Advisors provide advice for some vestibular patients who may be at higher risk for the coronavirus (COVID-19). VeDA has been receiving many questions about coronavirus (officially known as “2019-Novel Coronavirus,” “SARS-CoV19” or “COVID-19”) in the context of vestibular disorders.  We would like to share some of our thoughts with you to help answer some of these questions. In general, older individuals over the age of 60-70 are at greatest risk of severe COVID-19 infection, although individuals over age 18 have also been reported to have had severe COVID-19 illnesses. At this time, COVID-19 infection is mostly occurring through community transmission. RISK FACTORS FOR SOME PATIENTS WITH VESTIBULAR DISORDERS The following populations may be at higher risk for infection and severity of the disease: Patients with autoimmune diseases Patients receiving corticosteroids or biologics Persons over 60 years of age Persons with chronic […]

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VEDA - Published Thu Jul 23 2020 01:27    View Full Story...

VeDA announces a new partnership with Urban Poling, a Canadian company that manufactures and distributes walking poles that increase mobility and function at every age and fitness level. Many people with vestibular (inner ear and brain) balance dysfunction struggle with chronic balance problems and are unable to walk unassisted. Having a tool that ensures that they can exercise safely can promote compensation and assist in their recovery. An estimated 69 million Americans aged 40 and older will experience vestibular dysfunction at some point in their lives. While many people associate imbalance with aging, anyone, at any age, can lose their ability to balance. When she was 13 years old, Melissa B. sustained an injury to her inner ear during a commercial airline flight, which resulted in chronic dizziness, fatigue, unsteadiness, brain fog, nausea, and vomiting. After two surgeries, physical therapy, and many years, Melissa learned to adapt to the dizziness […]

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VEDA - Published Wed Jun 10 2020 21:48    View Full Story...

Dr. Alain Semont is a French physiotherapist known for introducing the Semont manuever for treatment of BPPV and coining the term, “vestibular rehabilitation.” Introduction Balance rehabilitation is commonly linked to disorders of the neuro-motor outputs of the equilibrium function. Disorders of stance, gait and posture are indications for balance rehabilitation or physiotherapy treatment, which include impairments for disorders of the cerebellum, Parkinson, proprioception, or functional impairments like astasia-abasia. Some other disorders are involved in the production of symptoms such as: spinning vertigo, dizziness, unsteadiness, or poor postural control with respect to verticality. These symptoms find their origin in disorders of the neuro-sensory inputs, which is the vestibular system associated to vision and hearing. It is highly integrated with other systems to produce essential reflexes for orientation, body stabilization, and gaze stabilization, which is vision during movement. The cortical areas associated to the peripheral system are responsible of self motion perception […]

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VEDA - Published Wed Apr 15 2020 22:31    View Full Story...

The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD) invited public comment on revisions to their strategic plan, which will determine future research directions and priorities. VeDA’s Medical & Scientific Advisers submitted the following answers to five questions. Question 1: What are the most significant scientific discoveries in hearing and balance, taste and smell, and voice, speech, and language that have occurred in the past five years? (Please provide references to scientific journal articles, if applicable.) Perception of motion is modifiable (Source) The vestibulo-ocular reflex can be driven separately for head rotation to both sides (Source). Here is a review paper of recent advances in motor learning of the VOR (Source). VHIT and VEMP tests. The VHIT has made it possible to diagnose vestibular neuritis more accurately. The oVEMP has made it possible to diagnose SCD. Discoveries at the cellular level, where neurophysiologists are finding out more about how the calyx ending […]

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VEDA - Published Mon Mar 30 2020 18:25    View Full Story...

VeDA’s Medical and Scientific Advisors provide advice for some vestibular patients who may be at higher risk for the coronavirus (COVID-19). By Drs. P. Ashley Wackym and Yuri Agrawal VeDA has been receiving many questions about coronavirus (officially known as “2019-Novel Coronavirus,” “SARS-CoV19” or “COVID-19”) in the context of vestibular disorders.  We would like to share some of our thoughts with you to help answer some of these questions. In general, older individuals over the age of 60-70 are at greatest risk of severe COVID-19 infection, although individuals over age 18 have also been reported to have had severe COVID-19 illnesses. At this time, COVID-19 infection is mostly occurring through community transmission. Risk factors for some patients with vestibular disorders The following populations may be at higher risk for infection and severity of the disease: Patients with autoimmune diseases Patients receiving corticosteroids or biologics Persons over 60 years of age […]

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VEDA - Published Tue Mar 24 2020 17:06    View Full Story...

Pacing means adopting new habits so you are able to participate in daily activities and not overstimulate yourself. Many patients with vestibular dysfunction become easily overwhelmed by basic daily activities, such as employment, shopping, cleaning, and childcare. Pacing can help you plan your day so you have more control. Dr. Lisa Farrell, PT, PhD gives pacing tips  for patients with vestibular dysfunction that are as simple as A, B, C. Aware Breath Change Here is a pacing checklist you can use to support your healing: Note Your Limits Be aware of what is happening right now and recognize how you are handling the situation. Pay attention to your self-talk and make sure that what you say to yourself supports your efforts to heal and live well. Do you talk negatively or positively to yourself? For example, do you think you are lazy when you take a nap? Or, when you rest, do […]

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VEDA - Published Tue Mar 17 2020 22:18    View Full Story...

This is a beginning chair yoga routine that is perfect for people who want to stretch, relax and strengthen, but are unable to stand for a practice. You can flow from one pose to the next, using the breath to guide you in a steady pace. Or you can do each pose separately holding for 10 seconds or longer. As you become comfortable with this practice feel free to repeat poses and hold for longer. You can also look up other poses to add. There are full-length chair yoga practices that offer all the benefits of standard yoga classes. Breathe, smile and relax. Mountain Pose – Find a firm chair, where your feet can rest flat on the floor, and your knees are directly above your ankles.Take some time to position yourself. If the chair is too high, place a folded blanket or towel under your feet to raise them […]

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VEDA - Published Thu Aug 15 2019 08:00    View Full Story...

Hyperacusis is hearing disorder that causes ordinary sounds to be perceived as unbearably loud. July 4th is the United States’ “Independence Day,” known for its picnics, BBQs and fireworks. For most, fireworks are an exciting marvel of colors and sounds. But for people with hyperacusis, fireworks are an agony. Hyperacusis is hearing disorder that causes ordinary sounds to be perceived as unbearably loud. For example, for a person with hyperacusis these ordinary sounds may lead to a physical and psychological response: A faucet dripping Running a dishwasher Using a microwave Having a normal conversation A car engine running Often by the time a person seeks treatment, their sensitivity to noise has progressed to an unbearable level. This disorder can start with mild sensitivity to sound, which continues to increase. As a person is dealing with these symptoms they may develop anxiety and other physiological and psychological symptoms. Fortunately, hyperacusis is a […]

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VEDA - Published Mon Jul 15 2019 08:00    View Full Story...

Some vestibular disorders, including vestibular migraine, can cause the patient to be more susceptible to light sensitivity. It’s Too Bright! The effects of chronic light sensitivity, also known as photophobia, are profound for those who experience it on a daily basis. It can cause pain in the eyes and brain, trigger physical symptoms of an underlying condition and even produce feelings of anxiety and isolation—and sometimes it only takes just a few seconds or minutes of exposure. The connection between light sensitivity and certain vestibular disorders is no different. A significant number of patients with these conditions must also endure the challenges of being light sensitive. And in their case, light acts as a catalyst for dizziness, vertigo, lightheadedness, headache and other symptoms that are often associated with these disorders. In this article, we take an in-depth look at the experiences of those with vestibular-related photophobia and offer tips for […]

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VEDA - Published Thu Jun 13 2019 08:00    View Full Story...

From in-person support groups to online support groups to social media “groups” – vestibular patients are connecting with their peers in many ways. Before the internet the only way for vestibular patients to connect with others was through in-person support groups. Support groups provide a unique and critical service: acceptance. This forum allows individuals to ask questions and to learn in a non-judgmental and safe environment. Participants know that everyone attending the support group meeting understands and has compassion for the functional difficulties of getting through each day. As a result, less frustration and energy are spent on proving or defining limitations. More energy is available for appreciating the character and companionship offered by others, and recognizing personal self-worth. Unfortunately, there aren’t enough brick-and-mortar support groups to meet the needs of all vestibular patients. In addition, some patients cannot attend an in-person support group, either because they can’t leave their […]

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VEDA - Published Thu Jun 13 2019 08:00    View Full Story...